Intest Res  
An analysis of dietary fiber and fecal fibre components including pH in rural Africans with colorectal cancer
Mohammed Faruk1,2, Sani Ibrahim3, Ahmed Adamu4,5, Abdulmumini Hassan Rafindadi1,2, Yahaya Ukwenya4,5, Yawale Iliyasu1,2, Abdullahi Adamu6,7, Surajo Mohammed Aminu8,9, Mohammed Sani Shehu1,2, Danladi Amodu Ameh3, Abdullahi Mohammed1,2, Saad Aliyu Ahmed1,2, John Idoko2, Atara Ntekim10,11, Aishatu Maude Suleiman8,9, Khalid Zahir Shah12, Kasimu Umar Adoke2
1Department of Pathology, Ahmadu Bello University Faculty of Medicine, Zaria, 2Department of Pathology, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, 3Department of Biochemistry, Ahmadu Bello University Faculty of Sciences, Zaria, 4Department of Surgery, Ahmadu Bello University Faculty of Medicine, Zaria, 5Department of Surgery Zaria, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, 6Department of Radiotherapy, Ahmadu Bello University Faculty of Medicine, Zaria, 7Department of Radiotherapy, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, 8Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Ahmadu Bello University Faculty of Medicine, Zaria, 9Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Shika Zaria, 10Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, 11Department of Radiation Oncology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, 12Department of Biomedical Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK
Correspondence to: Mohammed Faruk, Department of Pathology, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria 810001, Nigeria. Tel: +234-803-220-0648, Fax: +234-805-396-7557, E-mail: fmohammed@abu.edu.ng
Received: May 25, 2017; Revised: August 18, 2017; Accepted: September 3, 2017; Published online: November 23, 2017.
© Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Background/Aims: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is now a major public health problem with heavy morbidity and mortality in rural Africans despite the lingering dietary fibre-rich foodstuffs consumption. Studies have shown that increased intake of dietary fiber which contribute to low fecal pH and also influences the activity of intestinal microbiota, is associated with a lowered risk for CRC. However, whether or not the apparent high dietary fibre consumption by Africans do not longer protects against CRC risk is unknown. This study evaluated dietary fiber intake, fecal fiber components and pH levels in CRC patients. Methods: Thirty-five subjects (CRC=21, control=14), mean age 45 years were recruited for the study. A truncated food frequency questionnaire and modified Goering and Van Soest procedures were used. Results: We found that all subjects consumed variety of dietary fibre-rich foodstuffs. There is slight preponderance in consumption of dietary fibre by the control group than the CRC patients. We also found a significant difference in the mean fecal neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin contents from the CRC patients compared to the controls (P〈 0.05). The CRC patients had significantly more fecal pH level than the matched apparently healthy controls (P=0.017). Conclusions: The identified differences in the fecal fiber components and stool pH levels between the 2 groups may relate to CRC incidence and mortality in rural Africans. There is crucial need for more hypothesis-driven research with adequate funding on the cumulative preventive role of dietary fiber-rich foodstuffs against colorectal cancer in rural Africans “today.”
Keywords: Colorectal Neoplasm; Dietary Fiber; pH; Africa; Nigeria


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