Intest Res  
Impact of inflammatory bowel disease on daily life: an online survey by the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases
Young Sun Kim1, Sung-Ae Jung2, Kang-Moon Lee3, Soo Jung Park4, Tae Oh Kim5, Chang Hwan Choi6, Hyun Gun Kim7, Won Moon8, Chang Mo Moon2, Hye Kyoung Song2, Soo-Young Na9, Suk-Kyun Yang10, Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases (KASID)
1Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Healthcare System Gangnam Center, Seoul, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, 3Department of Internal Medicine, St. Vincent’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Suwon, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, 5Department of Internal Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, 6Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, 7Department of Internal Medicine, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, 8Department of Internal Medicine, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan, 9Department of Internal Medicine, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju, 10Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: Sung-Ae Jung, Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, 1071 Anyangcheon-ro, Yangcheongu, Seoul 07985, Korea. Tel: +82-2-2650-5053, Fax: +82-2-2655-2076, E-mail: jassa@ewha.ac.kr
Received: April 11, 2016; Revised: August 7, 2016; Accepted: August 8, 2016; Published online: May 29, 2017.
© Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disabling gastrointestinal disorder that diminishes the quality of life of the affected individuals. Limited data are available regarding the impact of IBD on the daily life of Koreans. Methods: Self-administered, computer-aided, internet-based questionnaires were distributed to members of a Korean patient organization for IBD from March to April 2013, by the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases. Results: A total of 599 patients with IBD (387 with Crohn’s disease [CD] and 212 with ulcerative colitis [UC]) were enrolled. The majority of patients (81%) expressed feelings of fatigue, weakness, and being worn out in their daily lives during times of flare; this percentage was reduced to 61% during remission. Respondents were absent from work or school for an average period of 18 days because of illness, within the first 6 months; the majority of respondents (64%) felt stressed about their absence. Forty-six percent of the respondents reported having received unfair comments at work, or having suffered discrimination. Forty-seven percent of the respondents felt that IBD had negatively affected their income and earnings. Compared with patients with UC, those with CD reported a more frequent negative impact of IBD on work, or more economic burden. More than half of the respondents (61%) reported that IBD had prevented them from making or keeping friends. Conclusions: IBD significantly impacts daily life, including work, education, and social relationships. Treatment that addresses the full spectrum of life of a patient would be more effective.
Keywords: Inflammatory bowel disease; Crohn disease; Colitis, ulcerative; Quality of life; Surveys and questionnaires


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